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American Artifacts: Old Sturbridge Village

Sturbridge, Massachusetts
Monday, August 27, 2012

American History TV visits Old Sturbridge Village, Massachusetts, a “living history” museum that depicts early New England life from 1790 to 1840. Now, we hear from costumed historians who present what is was like to live and work in 19th-century New England. Curator Tom Kelleher serves as our guide.

Updated: Monday, August 27, 2012 at 4:17pm (ET)

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