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American Artifacts: Old Guard Leather Shop

Old Guard Leather Shop at Ft. Myer in Arlington, Virginia

Old Guard Leather Shop at Ft. Myer in Arlington, Virginia

Arlington, Virginia
Sunday, November 10, 2013

C-SPAN visited the Old Guard Leather Shop at Ft. Myer in Arlington, Virginia to learn about work on presidential and military horse-drawn funeral caissons, which are prepared according to century-old traditions. We spoke to Eugene Burks, who has worked at the 3rd U.S. Army Infantry Regiment Leather Shop as a saddlemaker since 1981, and he discusses preparring horses for President Reagan's funeral. 

Updated: Monday, November 11, 2013 at 11:12am (ET)

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