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American Artifacts: National Firearms Museum

Fairfax, Virginia
Sunday, March 16, 2014

In a visit to the NRA’s National Firearms Museum, we meet museum director Jim Supica and senior curator Phil Schreier, who talk about the museum’s collection of guns, and explain the roles these weapons have played in the settlement, expansion and preservation of the United States.

Updated: Monday, March 17, 2014 at 8:16am (ET)

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