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American Artifacts: Museum of the Confederacy

Display case showing Confederate flag captured at Pickett's Charge in Gettysburg.

Display case showing Confederate flag captured at Pickett's Charge in Gettysburg.

Richmond, Virginia
Sunday, November 11, 2012

 The Museum of the Confederacy in downtown Richmond, Virginia has been in operation since 1896. Its collection of over 130,000 artifacts includes the personal belongings of well-known generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson. The museum's Sam Craghead took us on a tour of vintage battle flags, uniforms, photographs and weapons.

Updated: Monday, November 19, 2012 at 5:12pm (ET)

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