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American Artifacts: Milwaukee History & Architecture

Historian Kathy Kean in the Milwaukee Grain Exchange

Historian Kathy Kean in the Milwaukee Grain Exchange

Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Sunday, October 7, 2012

American History TV takes a tour of historic neighborhoods and buildings in Milwaukee including the 1879 Grain Exchange, Walker's Point Historic District, and Menomonee Valley. Our tour guide is retired high school history teacher Kathy Kean, who has been organizing history & architecture tours for over 30 years. We also spoke with Laura Bray, Executive Director of Menomonee Valley Redevelopment.

Updated: Monday, October 8, 2012 at 1:41pm (ET)

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