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American Artifacts: Life, Death & Legacy of Abraham Lincoln

Washington, DC
Sunday, February 19, 2012

Travel back to April 15, 1865—and the manhunt for Abraham Lincoln’s assassin. We visit the Center for Education and Leadership which opened this month across from Ford’s Theatre in Washington, DC. It was there that John Wilkes Booth shot Lincoln as he enjoyed the play “Our American Cousin.” We see the 35-foot tower of Lincoln books symbolizing one of the most documented lives in human history, and walk through exhibits that contemplate Lincoln’s life, death and legacy.

Updated: Monday, February 27, 2012 at 2:34pm (ET)

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Book TV (late 2012)
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