All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

American Artifacts: Jamestown Archaeology Lab (Part 2)

Bly Straube in the Jamestown Artifacts

Bly Straube in the Jamestown Artifacts "Vault"

Jamestown Island, Virginia
Sunday, January 15, 2012

American History TV visited the Jamestown Rediscovery project's archaeology and conservation labs to learn how history is revealed through artifacts. The original 1607 English fort was discovered in 1994, and over a million objects have been unearthed and catalogued since then.  In a related American Artifacts program, we took a tour of the current excavation sites. Part two of a three-part series.

Updated: Friday, May 4, 2012 at 9:41am (ET)

Related Events

American Artifacts: Jamestown Rediscovery Project (Part 1)
Sunday, January 8, 2012     

The original 1607 English settlement at Jamestown, Virginia had long been considered lost under the James River. Then, in 1994, archaeologist and historian Bill Kelso found evidence of the site. Since then, the Jamestown Rediscovery Project has unearthed more than a million artifacts, including many complete skeletons of the settlers. American History TV visited Jamestown for an “in the trenches” archaeology tour with Mr. Kelso, the project director. Part one of a three-part series.

A Look Back at the Founding of Jamestown
Saturday, May 14, 2011     

Four centuries after the founding of Jamestown in May of 1607, the area near the settlement has become an active place of study for archeologists.

American Artifacts: Maryland Archaeological Conservation Lab
Sunday, December 19, 2010     

C-SPAN visited the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Lab in St. Leonard, Maryland to learn more about work at the facility. About eight million objects are housed at the "MAC Lab."

American Artifacts: Monocacy Slave Quarters
Sunday, January 2, 2011     

Joy Beasley, Cultural Resources Program manager at Monocacy National Battlefield, describes the recent discovery and effort to excavate a 200 year-old slave quarters. The discovery took place on the National Park Service property near the site of the Best Family Farm, built in the 1790s by a family of French Caribbean immigrants who owned about ninety slaves.

Lectures in History: 1960s & 1970s Popular Music and Feminism
Thursday     

Indiana University professor Michael McGerr discusses feminism and its impact on popular music in the 1960s and ‘70s. The class is part of a course called “Rock, Hip Hop and Revolution: Popular Music in the Making of Modern America, 1940 to the Present.”

Lectures in History: Civil Rights & the “War on Poverty”
Monday     

Oregon State University professor Marisa Chappell discusses the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s and the anti-poverty and entitlement programs that were part of President Lyndon Johnson’s “War on Poverty.” She also details the societal attitudes toward impoverished minorities at the time, focusing on the challenges faced by single mothers. 

Lectures in History: Remembering the Civil War
Monday     

Central Connecticut State University professor Robert Wolff and his class examine how the memory of the Civil War has changed from its 50th and 100th anniversaries to the present. 

Lectures in History: Comparing the Reconstruction & Civil Rights Eras
Monday     

College of William & Mary professor Melvin Ely and his students compare the Reconstruction and Civil Rights eras, exploring many of the similarities and differences between the post-Civil War South and what Professor Ely calls "The Second Reconstruction" of the 1960s. This class is part of a course called “African American History from Emancipation to the Present.”

The Presidency: How Presidents Make Decisions
Sunday     

How do presidents make important decisions – whether it’s firing cabinet officials or going to war? Hear about their decision-making process from former chiefs of staff and advisers to presidents Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama. The panelists also detailed their own relationships with the presidents they served, and discussed their time in the White House. The Panetta Institute for Public Policy hosted this event. Former Secretary of Defense, Leon Panetta, moderated the discussion. 

Roosevelt’s Role in Preparing for D-Day
Sunday     

Author Nigel Hamilton discusses President Roosevelt’s role in preparing the allied forces for the D-Day invasion of Normandy. He argues that Roosevelt, by pushing for earlier military operations such as the North African campaign, ensured that the allied forces would be combat-hardened and prepared for D-Day. Hamilton is the author of a new book, "The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941-1942." The Dwight D. Eisenhower Library and Museum hosted this event. 

Share This Event Via Social Media
C-SPAN Gifts (late 2012)