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American Artifacts: Jackson's Flank Attack at Chancellorsville

1863 Map of Jackson's Flank Attack on the Union 11th Corps

1863 Map of Jackson's Flank Attack on the Union 11th Corps

Spotsylvania County, Virginia
Sunday, June 16, 2013

The Civil War Battle of Chancellorsville was fought April 30 to May 6, 1863, in Spotsylvania County, Virginia. Many historians consider the battle to be Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s greatest victory. Facing a Union Army more than twice the size of his own, Lee divided his forces, sending 27,000 men under “Stonewall” Jackson on a 12-mile march to deliver a flank attack. In this program, we follow two National Park Service historians on a tour as they walk the same ground exactly 150 years after Jackson launched his attack.

Updated: Friday, October 11, 2013 at 6:48pm (ET)

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