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American Artifacts: Internet Archive

November 17, 2013 at 8a & 7p ET

Likenesses of the employees of the Internet Archive in terra cotta

Likenesses of the employees of the Internet Archive in terra cotta

San Francisco, California
Sunday, November 17, 2013

An online digital library, the Internet Archive was founded in 1996 and strives to offer permanent access to digital historical collections for scholars, historians, people with disabilities, and the general public.  The archive provides access to video, music, audio, books, and through the "Wayback Machine" - billions of images of the internet dating back to 1996's presidential election campaign sites.

The archive stores over three million books and over one million videos, including thousands produced by the federal government.

In this program we visit the San Francisco headquarters and interview founder and digital librarian Brewster Kahle, scanning supervisor Jesse Bell, and board member Rick Prelinger.

Updated: Monday, November 18, 2013 at 9:01am (ET)

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