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American Artifacts: History of Printing

Baltimore Museum of Industry printing expert Ray Loomis

Baltimore Museum of Industry printing expert Ray Loomis

Baltimore, Maryland
Sunday, November 18, 2012

Eighty-three year-old Ray Loomis has worked in the printing industry since he was 15 years old. American History TV visited the Baltimore Museum of Industry where's he's a volunteer to see a demonstration of historic printing methods and machines, including the revolutionary Linotype, which was invented in Baltimore by German immigrant Ottmar Mergenthaler.

Updated: Monday, November 19, 2012 at 10:01am (ET)

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