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American Artifacts: History of Computers (Part 2)

1976 Apple 1 Computer at the Computer History Museum

1976 Apple 1 Computer at the Computer History Museum

Mountain View, California
Sunday, August 11, 2013

American History TV visits the Computer History Museum in Northern California's Silicon Valley to learn about the history of computers. This is the second of a two-part look at their exhibit, "Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing." This program begins with a look at how Silicon Valley was created and ends with the first Google search engine computer servers.

Our tourguides are Senior Curator Dag Spicer, and museum President and CEO John Hollar.

Updated: Monday, August 12, 2013 at 10:32am (ET)

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