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American Artifacts: Health & Fitness Inventions

1830 Patent Drawing

1830 Patent Drawing

Washington, DC
Sunday, March 10, 2013

American History TV visited Alexandria, Virginia and the National Inventors Hall of Fame and Museum - inside the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office - to tour an exhibit about health & fitness inventions. We'll learn about 19th century patent medicines, a mechanical horse used by President Calvin Coolidge, the origins of Gatorade & Nike, and the trademarks and patents of fitness guru Jack LaLanne.

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office was designated in the Constitution and originated in 1790. 

Updated: Monday, March 11, 2013 at 12:10am (ET)

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