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American Artifacts: Gulf of Tonkin Documents

50th Anniversary of Tonkin Resolution

Formerly Classified Summary of Tonkin Incidents

Formerly Classified Summary of Tonkin Incidents

Washington, DC
Sunday, August 3, 2014

A visit to the National Security Archive in George Washington University to learn about declassified documents related to the Gulf of Tonkin incidents of August 2 and 4th, 1964.  Archive Director Thomas Blanton argues that we know much more now about the events that led to the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution & escalation of the Vietnam War than policy makers knew at the time.

Updated: Monday, August 4, 2014 at 9:44am (ET)

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