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American Artifacts: Granary Burying Ground (Part 1)

Boston
Sunday, October 28, 2012

Granary Burying Ground in downtown Boston was established in the year 1660 and is the city’s third oldest cemetery. It’s also the burial site of several notable American Revolutionaries, including Paul Revere, John Hancock and Samuel Adams. American History TV visited the cemetery with Kelly Thomas, program manager for the City of Boston’s Historic Burying Grounds Initiative.

Updated: Friday, December 14, 2012 at 7:02pm (ET)

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