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American Artifacts: Gilmore Cabin at Montpelier

Gilmore Cabin at James Madison's Montpelier

Gilmore Cabin at James Madison's Montpelier

Orange, Virginia
Sunday, November 25, 2012

The history of the transition from slavery to freedom for African Americans is told at the Gilmore Cabin on the grounds of James Madison's Montpelier in Virginia.  Born a slave for President Madison in 1810, George Gilmore and his wife Polly raised five children on a small sharecropper farm after emancipation.  Built by George Gilmore and his sons, the cabin is one of only a few existing freedman's homes left standing in the United States.

In this program, we also visit a reconstructed Jim Crow train station near the cabin, where segregated "white" and "colored" waiting rooms were once the law of Virginia.

Updated: Monday, November 26, 2012 at 9:53am (ET)

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