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American Artifacts: Gilded Age New York

Museum of the City of New York Exhibit

Michele Gordigiani, “Cornelia Ward Hall and Her Children,” 1880

Michele Gordigiani, “Cornelia Ward Hall and Her Children,” 1880

New York City
Sunday, March 23, 2014

A visit to the Museum of the City of New York to learn how the "one percent" lived in the 19th century. The exhibit "Gilded New York" includes paintings, jewelry, gowns, and decorative arts used by the wealthiest New Yorkers in a time of unabashed excess.  Our tour guides are museum curators Jeannine Falino and Phyllis Magidson.

Updated: Friday, March 28, 2014 at 2:59pm (ET)

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