All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

American Artifacts: Federal Architecture in Milwaukee

Milwaukee in 1898

Milwaukee in 1898

Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Sunday, September 30, 2012

American Artifacts travels to Wisconsin to see two U.S. Government institutions built in the 19th century. Constructed by the Treasury Department, the Milwaukee Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse was completed in 1899, and has recently been restored.  The Milwaukee National Soldiers Home, one of three authorized by Abraham Lincoln in March of 1865, is still an active Department of Veteran's Affairs Center, but many of the original historic buildings on the 90 acre grounds are vacant.

Our guide is Kathy Kean, a retired Wisconsin High School teacher who has organized history & architecture tours in Milwaukee for over thirty years, Ms. Kean was presented with the “Preserve America History Teacher of the Year” award in 2004 by First Lady Laura Bush.

Updated: Monday, October 1, 2012 at 11:33am (ET)

Related Events

American Artifacts: Captain Frederick Pabst Mansion (Part 1)
Sunday, May 20, 2012     

We tour the restored 1892 mansion of Captain Frederick Pabst in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The sea captain not only founded the world famous Pabst Brewery, he was a philanthropist and real estate developer and had a great influence on the growth of this Midwestern city on Lake Michigan. Historian John Eastberg shows us examples of craftsmanship, original furnishings and art which teach us about Pabst’s German heritage, Milwaukee’s history, and America’s Gilded Age.

American Artifacts: Captain Frederick Pabst Mansion (Part 2)
Sunday, May 27, 2012     

In this second American Artifacts featuring the Pabst Mansion, historian John Eastberg continues his tour of the Milwaukee beer baron's gilded-age home.  We'll visit the servants' dining room, Frederick Pabts' germanic study, a recently restored bedroom, and a tera cotta pavilion that is one of the few structures remaining from the 1893 Chicago Columbian Exposition.

American Artifacts: U.S. Department of Treasury Building Part 2
Sunday, May 15, 2011     

Curator Richard Cote leads us on a tour of the Treasury building to learn about a long-term restoration project begun in 1986. In the second half of a two-part program, we see Secretary Timothy Geithner's office, a suite of rooms that has served Treasury Secretaries since 1910. We also learn about the restoration of the ornate West Dome and the gold gilding that had once been painted over and forgotten.

American Artifacts: Treasury Building Restoration
Sunday, April 17, 2011     

Treasury Department Curator Richard Cote takes us on a behind-the-scenes tour of the Cash Room, the Salmon Chase Suite, and the President Andrew Johnson Suite. Each of these rooms has recently been restored as part of an ongoing renovation effort funded by the Treasury Historical Association. This is the first half of a two part program.

Lectures in History: Civil Rights & the “War on Poverty”
Monday     

Oregon State University professor Marisa Chappell discusses the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s and the anti-poverty and entitlement programs that were part of President Lyndon Johnson’s “War on Poverty.” She also details the societal attitudes toward impoverished minorities at the time, focusing on the challenges faced by single mothers. 

Lectures in History: Remembering the Civil War
Monday     

Central Connecticut State University professor Robert Wolff and his class examine how the memory of the Civil War has changed from its 50th and 100th anniversaries to the present. 

Lectures in History: Comparing the Reconstruction & Civil Rights Eras
Monday     

College of William & Mary professor Melvin Ely and his students compare the Reconstruction and Civil Rights eras, exploring many of the similarities and differences between the post-Civil War South and what Professor Ely calls "The Second Reconstruction" of the 1960s. This class is part of a course called “African American History from Emancipation to the Present.”

The Presidency: How Presidents Make Decisions
Sunday     

How do presidents make important decisions – whether it’s firing cabinet officials or going to war? Hear about their decision-making process from former chiefs of staff and advisers to presidents Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama. The panelists also detailed their own relationships with the presidents they served, and discussed their time in the White House. The Panetta Institute for Public Policy hosted this event. Former Secretary of Defense, Leon Panetta, moderated the discussion. 

Roosevelt’s Role in Preparing for D-Day
Sunday     

Author Nigel Hamilton discusses President Roosevelt’s role in preparing the allied forces for the D-Day invasion of Normandy. He argues that Roosevelt, by pushing for earlier military operations such as the North African campaign, ensured that the allied forces would be combat-hardened and prepared for D-Day. Hamilton is the author of a new book, "The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941-1942." The Dwight D. Eisenhower Library and Museum hosted this event. 

Reel America: LBJ’s 1964 Acceptance Speech
Sunday     

Fifty years ago, on August  27, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson accepted his party's nomination at the Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey.  He outlined the goals of what he called the "Great Society.” Less than a year earlier, LBJ had been sworn in to office following President Kennedy’s assassination. He went on to win the general election against Republican Senator Barry Goldwater.

Share This Event Via Social Media
C-SPAN on Facebook (late 2012)