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American Artifacts: Federal Architecture in Milwaukee

Milwaukee in 1898

Milwaukee in 1898

Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Sunday, September 30, 2012

American Artifacts travels to Wisconsin to see two U.S. Government institutions built in the 19th century. Constructed by the Treasury Department, the Milwaukee Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse was completed in 1899, and has recently been restored.  The Milwaukee National Soldiers Home, one of three authorized by Abraham Lincoln in March of 1865, is still an active Department of Veteran's Affairs Center, but many of the original historic buildings on the 90 acre grounds are vacant.

Our guide is Kathy Kean, a retired Wisconsin High School teacher who has organized history & architecture tours in Milwaukee for over thirty years, Ms. Kean was presented with the “Preserve America History Teacher of the Year” award in 2004 by First Lady Laura Bush.

Updated: Monday, October 1, 2012 at 11:33am (ET)

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