All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

American Artifacts: Federal Architecture in Milwaukee

Milwaukee in 1898

Milwaukee in 1898

Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Sunday, September 30, 2012

American Artifacts travels to Wisconsin to see two U.S. Government institutions built in the 19th century. Constructed by the Treasury Department, the Milwaukee Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse was completed in 1899, and has recently been restored.  The Milwaukee National Soldiers Home, one of three authorized by Abraham Lincoln in March of 1865, is still an active Department of Veteran's Affairs Center, but many of the original historic buildings on the 90 acre grounds are vacant.

Our guide is Kathy Kean, a retired Wisconsin High School teacher who has organized history & architecture tours in Milwaukee for over thirty years, Ms. Kean was presented with the “Preserve America History Teacher of the Year” award in 2004 by First Lady Laura Bush.

Updated: Monday, October 1, 2012 at 11:33am (ET)

Related Events

American Artifacts: Captain Frederick Pabst Mansion (Part 1)
Sunday, May 20, 2012     

We tour the restored 1892 mansion of Captain Frederick Pabst in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The sea captain not only founded the world famous Pabst Brewery, he was a philanthropist and real estate developer and had a great influence on the growth of this Midwestern city on Lake Michigan. Historian John Eastberg shows us examples of craftsmanship, original furnishings and art which teach us about Pabst’s German heritage, Milwaukee’s history, and America’s Gilded Age.

American Artifacts: Captain Frederick Pabst Mansion (Part 2)
Sunday, May 27, 2012     

In this second American Artifacts featuring the Pabst Mansion, historian John Eastberg continues his tour of the Milwaukee beer baron's gilded-age home.  We'll visit the servants' dining room, Frederick Pabts' germanic study, a recently restored bedroom, and a tera cotta pavilion that is one of the few structures remaining from the 1893 Chicago Columbian Exposition.

American Artifacts: U.S. Department of Treasury Building Part 2
Sunday, May 15, 2011     

Curator Richard Cote leads us on a tour of the Treasury building to learn about a long-term restoration project begun in 1986. In the second half of a two-part program, we see Secretary Timothy Geithner's office, a suite of rooms that has served Treasury Secretaries since 1910. We also learn about the restoration of the ornate West Dome and the gold gilding that had once been painted over and forgotten.

American Artifacts: Treasury Building Restoration
Sunday, April 17, 2011     

Treasury Department Curator Richard Cote takes us on a behind-the-scenes tour of the Cash Room, the Salmon Chase Suite, and the President Andrew Johnson Suite. Each of these rooms has recently been restored as part of an ongoing renovation effort funded by the Treasury Historical Association. This is the first half of a two part program.

President Warren Harding’s Love Letters
Today     

We hear from a panel about the personal and political consequences of Warren Harding’s long term love affair. The affair predated the 29th president's administration. Surviving love letters detailing the relationship were until very recently kept under seal by the Library of Congress, which hosted this event. The former president’s grandnephew, Richard Harding, explains why his family insisted on keeping the letters sealed and how the family continues to deal with the fallout from the affair and its impact on Warren Harding’s legacy.

National World War I Memorial
Today     

Edwin Fountain of the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission discusses efforts to re-develop Pershing Park in Washington, DC as a site to commemorate those who sacrificed their lives during World War I. Currently the park is the site of a memorial to General John Pershing, who commanded the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I.

Establishment of Religious Freedom in U.S.
Today     

Author Thomas Buckley discusses the establishment of religious freedom in the U.S. Mr. Buckley focuses on Virginia’s groundbreaking statute on religious freedom authored by Thomas Jefferson and its role in bringing freedom of religion to the newly independent United States. Buckley also describes how the statute’s influence has extended into the 20th century and the Supreme Court’s modern interpretation of the separation of church and state.

The Life of Westerner Tom Horn: 1860 - 1903
Today     

Author Larry Ball discusses the life and legacy of westerner Tom Horn, who lived from 1860 to 1903. Ball describes Horn’s work as a gunman for the Pinkerton Detective Agency and Wyoming Cattlemen's Association, as well as his murder conviction and execution in 1903. The New Mexico History Museum hosted the event.

History Bookshelf: Jim Crow Laws & School Integration
Today     

Author Rawn James describes Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall’s early career and profiles his mentor, Charles Hamilton Houston. The two lawyers led the NAACP’s legal office in challenging Jim Crow laws with a focus on school integration.

Atomic Bomb Survivors & President Truman’s Grandson
Today     

President Truman’s grandson, Clifton Truman Daniel, joins atomic bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki to discuss the lasting legacy of the nuclear attacks that ended World War II in the Pacific. It was President Truman who ordered the bombs dropped on the Japanese cities. We’ll hear the survivors describe the attacks as they experienced them – and the lasting emotional and physical effects of the bombings. This event was hosted by the Japan Society. 

Share This Event Via Social Media
Washington Journal (late 2012)