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American Artifacts: Early American Politics

1804 Political Cartoon Depicting Thomas Jefferson & Sally Hemings (AAS)

1804 Political Cartoon Depicting Thomas Jefferson & Sally Hemings (AAS)

Worcester, MA
Sunday, October 21, 2012

Each week American Artifacts takes viewers into archives, museums and historic sites around the country. The American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Massachusetts, is an independent research library founded in 1812 by Revolutionary War patriot and printer Isaiah Thomas. American History TV visited the library to look at their early American political collection, including ballots, cartoons and party newspapers.

Updated: Monday, October 22, 2012 at 11am (ET)

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