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American Artifacts: Confederate Winter Quarters

Debuted February 2, at 8a & 7p ET

Reconstructing Confederate Winter Huts near Montpelier

Reconstructing Confederate Winter Huts near Montpelier

Orange, Virginia
Sunday, February 2, 2014

One hundred and fifty years ago - in the winter of 1864 - a South Carolina brigade of the confederate army camped in wooden huts in Virginia on the grounds of Montpelier, the former estate of President James Madison.
 
Matthew Reeves, Director of Archaeology at James Madison's Montpelier takes American History TV on a tour of a reconstruction and archaeology project striving to learn more about how Civil War soldiers lived - and often died - in winter quarters.

Updated: Wednesday, February 5, 2014 at 9:41am (ET)

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