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American Artifacts: Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office (Part 2)

Historian Susan Rosenvold on the steps used by Clara Barton.

Historian Susan Rosenvold on the steps used by Clara Barton.

Washington, DC
Sunday, July 29, 2012

Clara Barton died 100 years ago on April 12, 1912. Between 1861 and 1868, she lived in a Washington, DC boarding house and employed as many as twelve clerks in her "Missing Soldiers Office."  In 1996 the General Services Administration was preparing the building for demolition when they discovered artifacts eventually proving that this was the lost office of the founder of the American Red Cross. 

American History TV visited the building on seventh street to learn more about the life and work of humanitarian Clara Barton.

Updated: Tuesday, May 20, 2014 at 5:52pm (ET)

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