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American Artifacts: Civil War Battle of Shiloh

Hardin County, Tennessee
Sunday, April 22, 2012

The Civil War Battle of Shiloh took place April 6th and 7th, 1862 in Hardin County, Tennessee, and resulted in a Union victory over Confederate forces. We visited Shiloh National Military Park, where Stacy Allen, the Park's Chief Ranger, talked about some of the artifacts on display in the Visitor Center, including battle flags, arms and munitions, and personal items from soliders who fought in the battle. He also took us behind the scenes to the Park’s storage facility, where he showed us two rare Civil War tents.

Updated: Tuesday, April 24, 2012 at 4:25pm (ET)

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