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American Artifacts: Chatham Manor

Artist's conception of Chatham in the winter of 1862.

Artist's conception of Chatham in the winter of 1862.

Fredericksburg, Virginia
Sunday, December 30, 2012

American History TV visits Chatham Manor, the only known house in the U.S. visited by both George Washington and Abraham Lincoln.  Built in 1771 by Virginia Continental Congress delegate William Fitzhugh, it was a Union headquarters during the Civil War and a field hospital during the Battle of Fredricksburg where Clara Barton & Walt Whitman tended to the wounded and dying. Chatham was given to the National Park Service in 1975 and is part of Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park.

Updated: Tuesday, January 22, 2013 at 3:06pm (ET)

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