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American Artifacts: Cemeteries at Madison's Montpelier

Michael Quinn at the Slave Cemetery

Michael Quinn at the Slave Cemetery

Orange, Virginia
Sunday, March 25, 2012

American History TV travels to James Madison's Montpelier in Orange County, Virginia. In this program we learn about the Madison family cemetery, a nearby slave cemetery, and James Madison’s “temple,” a Greek and Roman inspired structure that James Madison had built in the early 1800's.  

The restored Montpelier mansion and estate is owned by the National Trust for Historic Preservation and operated by the Montpelier Foundation, dedicated to preserving the legacy of the fourth President, often referred to as the “father of the Constitution.”

Updated: Tuesday, April 17, 2012 at 8:43am (ET)

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