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American Artifacts: Captain Frederick Pabst Mansion (Part 2)

Historian John Eastberg inside the Pabst Mansion

Historian John Eastberg inside the Pabst Mansion

Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Sunday, May 27, 2012

In this second American Artifacts featuring the Pabst Mansion, historian John Eastberg continues his tour of the Milwaukee beer baron's gilded-age home.  We'll visit the servants' dining room, Frederick Pabts' germanic study, a recently restored bedroom, and a tera cotta pavilion that is one of the few structures remaining from the 1893 Chicago Columbian Exposition.

Updated: Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 10:07am (ET)

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