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American Artifacts: Captain Frederick Pabst Mansion (Part 1)

Bust of Captain Pabst in the front hall of the mansion

Bust of Captain Pabst in the front hall of the mansion

Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Sunday, May 20, 2012

We tour the restored 1892 mansion of Captain Frederick Pabst in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The sea captain not only founded the world famous Pabst Brewery, he was a philanthropist and real estate developer and had a great influence on the growth of this Midwestern city on Lake Michigan. Historian John Eastberg shows us examples of craftsmanship, original furnishings and art which teach us about Pabst’s German heritage, Milwaukee’s history, and America’s Gilded Age.

Updated: Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 4:38pm (ET)

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