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American Artifacts: California Historical Society - Part 1

Debuts Dec. 1, at 8a & 7p ET

19th Century San Francisco

19th Century San Francisco

San Francisco, California
Sunday, December 1, 2013

In this first of a two-part visit to the official historical society of the state of California, we explore the history of the waters and ports of San Francisco in the exhibit, "Curating the Bay." 

Updated: Monday, December 2, 2013 at 11:14am (ET)

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