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American Artifacts: Birmingham Civil Rights Institute

Birmingham Police

Birmingham Police "tank" used against civil rights demonstrators

Birmingham, Alabama
Sunday, November 3, 2013

In this program, we visit the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute in Alabama to learn about civil rights history. Exhibits we see include the bars and door from the jail cell in Birmingham where in 1963 Martin Luther King Jr. wrote his noted “Letter From Birmingham Jail,” and the "tank" used by the Birmingham Police Department to suppress civil rights demonstrations in the 1960s. Our guide for the tour is Ahmad Ward, Education and Exhibitions Director at the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute.  

Updated: Tuesday, November 5, 2013 at 7:23pm (ET)

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