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American Artifacts: B&O Railroad and the Civil War

Debuted Sunday, April 28 at 8am & 7pm ET

Train of soldiers on leave arrives in Washington, DC.

Train of soldiers on leave arrives in Washington, DC.

Baltimore, Maryland
Sunday, April 28, 2013

The B&O Railroad Museum in Baltimore is marking the 150th anniversary of the Civil War with the ongoing exhibit "The War Came by Train." We visited the museum's historic roundhouse building for a tour with guest curator Daniel Toomey.  Mr. Toomey argues that due to the extensive use of railroads and the telegraph, the Civil war was the first "modern war."

Updated: Saturday, May 4, 2013 at 9:48am (ET)

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