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American Artifacts: Baltimore Garment Industry

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Katzenberg Bros. Sewing Floor circa 1930 - Courtesy Ed Hawkins

Katzenberg Bros. Sewing Floor circa 1930 - Courtesy Ed Hawkins

Baltimore, Maryland
Sunday, February 23, 2014

American History TV visited the Baltimore Museum of Industry to learn about the history of the garment industry, which employed over 20 percent of the city's workers in the early 20th century.  Our tour guide is museum volunteer Ed Hawkins, who worked as a fabric "spreader" for a women's clothing manufacturer as a teenager in the 1940s.

Updated: Monday, February 24, 2014 at 3:58pm (ET)

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