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American Artifacts: Attempted Assassination of Ronald Reagan

White House Photographer Image Taken During Shooting

White House Photographer Image Taken During Shooting

Washington, DC
Sunday, April 1, 2012

Del Quentin Wilber, author of “Rawhide Down: The Near Assassination of Ronald Reagan,” met American History TV at the Washington Hilton to recreate the afternoon of March 30, 1981. On that day, John Hinckley fired six bullets at President Reagan, who had just completed a speech to the AFL-CIO. Using archival photographs and video, and declassified audio from the U.S. Secret Service, we trace the route of the presidential motorcade to The George Washington University Hospital. This program airs Sunday at 8am, 7pm, and 10pm ET.

Updated: Tuesday, April 3, 2012 at 4:57pm (ET)

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