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American Artifacts: 1930s-40s Color Photographs (Part 2)

Office of War Information Photograph of Airplane Construction

Office of War Information Photograph of Airplane Construction

Washington, DC
Tuesday, December 25, 2012

In this second of a two-part look at U.S. Government funded color photographs from the Library of Congress, we feature images created for the Office of War Information in the 1940’s. Photographers were assigned to travel the United States and document war production efforts.  Our guide is Curator of Photography Beverly Brannan.

Updated: Thursday, December 20, 2012 at 11:57am (ET)

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