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American Artifacts: 1297 Magna Carta

Unveiling the Magna Carta in a National Archives Lab

Unveiling the Magna Carta in a National Archives Lab

Washington, DC
Sunday, April 29, 2012

 After a year of conservation treatments, the National Archives is returning a 1297 copy of the Magna Carta to public display. One of only four originals from 1297, the document is owned by Carlyle Group founder David Rubenstein but is on permanent loan to the archives. Partnering with the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the archives designed a custom case to protect the fragile document.  In this event, the new encasement is unveiled and details of the project are discussed.

Updated: Monday, April 30, 2012 at 8:56am (ET)

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Washington Journal (late 2012)