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Amelia Earhart Expedition

Amelia Earhart

Amelia Earhart

Washington, DC
Sunday, April 6, 2014

Celebrity pilot Amelia Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan mysteriously disappeared over the Pacific Ocean on their attempted 1937 flight around the world. Did they crash into the sea or become castaways? We hear from the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR), which has investigated the disappearance over the last 25 years. They’ll also discuss their upcoming expedition to Nikumaroro Island in the Republic of Kiribati.

Updated: Monday, April 7, 2014 at 9:58am (ET)

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