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Alexander Hamilton & the Founding of the United States

New York City
Saturday, September 28, 2013

Author and historian Thomas Fleming details Alexander Hamilton’s role in the founding of the United States. He argues that Hamilton was both a realist and a visionary in his approach to government and finance. The Alexander Hamilton Awareness Society and the Museum of American Finance co-sponsored this event.

Updated: Monday, September 30, 2013 at 10:47am (ET)

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