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African Americans in Civil War Washington

Elizabeth Keckley

Elizabeth Keckley

Washington, DC
Saturday, January 25, 2014

As part of the DC Historical Studies Conference hosted at George Washington University in November, author and history professor Kate Masur discusses the politically active role of African Americans in Washington, DC during the Civil War. She specifically chronicles the work of two of Lincoln’s White House employees, Elizabeth Keckley and William Slade. This program was co-hosted by George Washington University and the Historical Society of Washington, DC.  

Updated: Monday, January 27, 2014 at 9:54am (ET)

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