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African Americans in 19th Century New York City

Brooklyn, 1879

Brooklyn, 1879

Brooklyn, New York
Sunday, March 9, 2014

Carla Peterson talks about her book “Black Gotham: A Family History of African Americans in Nineteenth-Century New York City” at the Brooklyn Historical Society. She examines the movement of black Americans to Brooklyn and their struggle to obtain and sustain rights through the Civil War. Ms. Peterson, who is also an English professor, details her family’s history in New York and the communities they helped build. 

Updated: Monday, March 10, 2014 at 10:36am (ET)

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