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Addiction in Early America

Library of Congress

Library of Congress

Washington, DC
Saturday, August 16, 2014

A panel of historians talks about how different social groups used and abused laudanum, opium, and alcohol in the 19th century. Alcoholism was primarily a male problem, while thousands of women were addicted to laudanum. The panel looks at how these addictions were treated and perceived across race, gender, and social class. This panel was part of the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic conference.

Updated: Sunday, August 17, 2014 at 10:43am (ET)

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