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Actors and Stagehands at the Lincoln Assassination

Sketch of Ford's Theater from 1865

Sketch of Ford's Theater from 1865

Washington, DC
Saturday, December 28, 2013

Forty-six stagehands, actors, and other workers were in Ford’s Theater on the night of April 14, 1865 when President Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth.

Up next, theater historian and author Thomas Bogar revisits the tragic event through the experiences and official testimony of some of the actors and employees of the Ford brothers, the owners who would never again stage a performance in the building. This event was hosted by the National Archives and lasts about an hour.

Updated: Monday, December 30, 2013 at 11:30am (ET)

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