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Abortion and the Evolution of the Religious Right

Washington, DC, 1/22/80, Associated Press

Washington, DC, 1/22/80, Associated Press

Atlanta
Saturday, May 17, 2014

Princeton University history lecturer Neil Young discusses abortion politics and their impact on the religious right. He spoke with American History TV at the Organization of American Historians 2014 annual meeting in Atlanta.

Updated: Sunday, May 18, 2014 at 4:08pm (ET)

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