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A Century Later: Reassessing World War I

American Troops, 1918

American Troops, 1918

Kansas City, Missouri
Sunday, August 17, 2014

World War I officially began on July 28, 1914 when Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia. Less than a month later, most of Europe had joined the war. As the world marks the centennial of the beginning of the conflict, the National World War I Museum in Kansas City hosts a panel of historians and authors who talk about the causes and effects of the conflict once known as the “war to end all wars.”

 

Updated: Monday, August 18, 2014 at 8:51am (ET)

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