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50th Anniversary of the Integration of Tuskegee High School

State Patrolmen Bar Students from Entering Tuskegee High School

State Patrolmen Bar Students from Entering Tuskegee High School

Tuskegee, Alabama
Saturday, September 14, 2013

50 years ago, Tuskegee High School was at the center of the fight over desegregation of the public schools in Alabama. Recently, former students – both black and white—gathered to reflect on their experience. They were joined by civil rights attorney Fred Gray, who represented the black students in the case of Lee v. Macon Board of Education, which eventually led to desegregation-- not only of the high school—but of all public schools in the state. Auburn University’s Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts and Humanities and the Tuskegee Human and Civil Rights Multicultural Center co-hosted this event.

Updated: Monday, September 16, 2013 at 9:54am (ET)

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