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50th Anniversary of New York Times v. Sullivan

Justice William J. Brennan, Jr.

Justice William J. Brennan, Jr.

Washington, DC
Sunday, April 13, 2014

Decided by the Warren Court in 1964, New York Times v. Sullivan was a landmark U.S. Supreme Court case, upholding the freedom of the press and greatly reducing the number of libel lawsuits. Attorneys Lee Levine and law professor Steve Wermiel tell the story of Justice Brennan’s struggle to thwart efforts to overturn the Sullivan case. Their new book is The Progeny: Justice William J. Brennan’s Fight to Preserve the Legacy of New York Times v. Sullivan. The Newseum hosted this event. 

Updated: Monday, April 14, 2014 at 10:43am (ET)

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