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2000 Presidential Debate

2000 Presidential Debate

2000 Presidential Debate

Winston-Salem, North Carolina
Sunday, October 21, 2012

In October of 2000, Republican Presidential Candidate Governor George W. Bush and Democratic Candidate Vice President Al Gore faced off in the second of three presidential debates. It was held at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and the moderator was PBS News Anchor Jim Lehrer.

Updated: Monday, October 22, 2012 at 10:08am (ET)

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Washington Journal (late 2012)