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19th Century Families in the American West

Fur Traders along Missouri River

Fur Traders along Missouri River

Kansas City, Missouri
Saturday, May 3, 2014

History professor and author Anne Hyde uses the story of three different pioneer families to discuss the history of the American West.  Her book, “Empires, Nations and Families: A History of the North American West, 1800-1860” explores the complicated relationship between American newcomers, Indians and Hispanics and how they created what Hyde calls “blended families.” The Kansas City Public Library hosted this event. 

Updated: Sunday, May 4, 2014 at 10:39am (ET)

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