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1964 Mississippi Summer Project

Atlanta
Sunday, June 22, 2014

From the Organization of American Historians 2014 annual meeting in Atlanta, reflections from three veterans of the 1964 Mississippi Summer Project, an African American voter registration effort coordinated among several Southern civil rights organizations. More than 1,000 volunteers—many of them college students—from around the country went to Mississippi to participate in the project, also known as “Freedom Summer.” They faced threats and abuse from state and local authorities and the Ku Klux Klan. The worst of the violence ended in the murders of three volunteers—James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner—in late June of 1964. Michael Schwerner’s widow, Rita Bender, now a Seattle University law professor, participates in this event; and she’s joined by civil rights activist Dorie Ladner and Brown University Africana Studies professor Charles Cobb.

Updated: Monday, June 23, 2014 at 9:57am (ET)

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