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1963 Birmingham Civil Rights Campaign

Woman Being Arrested in Birmingham, 1963

Woman Being Arrested in Birmingham, 1963

Eufaula, Alabama
Saturday, May 4, 2013

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Birmingham civil rights campaign. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote his famed “Letter from Birmingham Jail” after being arrested for taking part in the protests. The campaign gained national attention after local officials used dogs and water cannons on kids after they took to the streets in what was known as the “Children’s Crusade.” A panel of authors and historians recall the turmoil of the time, as well as how Birmingham has chosen to remember its past. This event was part of the Alabama Historical Association’s annual conference.

Updated: Friday, August 16, 2013 at 10:32am (ET)

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