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1960s-Era Counterculture

Vietnam War Protesters, 1967

Vietnam War Protesters, 1967

Atlanta, Georgia
Monday, May 26, 2014

From the Organization of American Historians 2014 annual meeting in Atlanta, a conversation about the 1960s counterculture with authors and history professors Alice Echols and David Farber. 

Updated: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 at 9:39am (ET)

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