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1944 Bretton Woods Conference & Harry Dexter White

Harry Dexter White & British Representative John Maynard Keynes

Harry Dexter White & British Representative John Maynard Keynes

New York City
Saturday, February 15, 2014

Weeks after D-Day in June of 1944, over 700 delegates from 44 nations convened in the New Hampshire town of Bretton Woods to design a new global financial regulation system. The United States and England were the two major countries involved in the discussions, with John Maynard Keynes representing Britain and Harry Dexter White representing America. After the conference, the U.S. dollar became the basis of the new financial system now known as the “Bretton Woods System.” Council on Foreign Relations Senior Fellow Benn Steil talks about his book on the subject, and he details Harry Dexter White’s connections to and sympathies with communist Soviet officials in the 1940s and 1950s. The New York Military Affairs Symposium hosted this event.

Updated: Saturday, February 15, 2014 at 12:56pm (ET)

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