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150th Anniversary of the Civil War Battle of Antietam

Antietam, MD
Sunday, September 16, 2012

The Battle of Antietam took place September 17, 1862, and was the bloodiest day of fighting in American history. President Lincoln took advantage of the Union strategic victory to issue the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation a few days later.

Historians Brooks Simpson and Mark Grimsley lead C-SPAN3 History cameras on a day-long tour of Antietam National Battlefield visiting key locations at the National Park.  Sights include the Cornfield, Sunken Lane and Burnside Bridge, the historians use the landscape and demonstrations to show what the battle was like for the armies on the ground.

On Sunday, C-SPAN3 is LIVE from at the Antietam National Battlefield near Sharpsburg, Maryland, covering the events and battles that surround the anniversary.

Civil War Battle of Antietam Schedule:

12pm - Remarks by Former National Park Service Chief Historian

1pm - Viewer Calls & Tweets with  Keith Snyder, Antietam National Battlefield Park Ranger

2pm -  Remarks by Kathleen Ernst, Author, "Too Afraid to Cry: Maryland Civilians in the Antietam Campaign"

3pm - Viewer Calls & Tweets: Edna Greene Medford, Howard University History Professor and Co-Author, "The Emancipation Proclamation: Three Views"

4pm - Remarks: Mark Neely, Author, "Lincoln and the Triumph of the Nation: Constitutional Conflict in the American Civil War"

5:30pm - Viewer Calls & Tweets: James McPherson, Civil War Historian & Author, "Crossroads of Freedom: Antietam"

6:15pm - Viewer Calls & Tweets: Harold Holzer, Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Foundation Chairman and Author, "Emancipating Lincoln: The Proclamation in Text, Context & Memory"

7pm - Remarks: James McPherson, Civil War Historian & Author, "Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era" and Edwin Bearss,  Former National Park Service Chief Historian and Author, "Fields of Honor: Pivotal Battles of the Civil War."

Join C-SPAN's American History TV on facebook at facebook.com/c-spanhistory and following the programming on twitter with hashtag: #cspanantietam.

Updated: Friday, September 14, 2012 at 1:31pm (ET)

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